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Bindings
#1
Hi All,

I have a Salomon Link with some older K2 Plasma 10 bindings that need
to be replaced. Do any of you have any suggestions for a
replacement? I freeride only and am looking for something that is a
little forgiving and not too rigid. I have looked at the Flow setup
and like the in/out design but I have heard that they do not collapse
making travel a bit tough.

Does anyone have any insight on who is putting out the best product?

thanks,

Sean
Reply
#2
On Jan 3, 9:34 pm, Sean <[email protected]> wrote:[color=blue]
> Hi All,
>
> I have a Salomon Link with some older K2 Plasma 10 bindings that need
> to be replaced.  Do any of you have any suggestions for a
> replacement?  I freeride only and am looking for something that is a
> little forgiving and not too rigid.  I have looked at the Flow setup
> and like the in/out design but I have heard that they do not collapse
> making travel a bit tough.[/color]

By "travel," do you mean in a car, or on a plane? If you detach the
strap -- something you wouldn't do in day-to-day use, but is OK for
traveling -- you can push the Flow highback down farther, making it
easier to pack and ship your board. If you don't do that, you are
correct that the Flows create larger "humps" on the board than strap
bindings. Still, I've found that they will fit through the typical
automobile trunk-rear seat pass-through.
[color=blue]
> Does anyone have any insight on who is putting out the best product?[/color]

I have the Ride SPi's, which I like a lot. Good for freeriding,
although the aluminum base is probably more rigid than some of the
plastic models available.

Joe Ramirez

Reply
#3
On Jan 3, 11:09 pm, [email protected] wrote:[color=blue]
> On Jan 3, 9:34 pm, Sean <[email protected]> wrote:
>[color=green]
> > Hi All,[/color]
>[color=green]
> > I have a Salomon Link with some older K2 Plasma 10 bindings that need
> > to be replaced.  Do any of you have any suggestions for a
> > replacement?  I freeride only and am looking for something that is a
> > little forgiving and not too rigid.  I have looked at the Flow setup
> > and like the in/out design but I have heard that they do not collapse
> > making travel a bit tough.[/color]
>
> By "travel," do you mean in a car, or on a plane? If you detach the
> strap -- something you wouldn't do in day-to-day use, but is OK for
> traveling -- you can push the Flow highback down farther, making it
> easier to pack and ship your board. If you don't do that, you are
> correct that the Flows create larger "humps" on the board than strap
> bindings. Still, I've found that they will fit through the typical
> automobile trunk-rear seat pass-through.
>[color=green]
> > Does anyone have any insight on who is putting out the best product?[/color]
>
> I have the Ride SPi's, which I like a lot. Good for freeriding,
> although the aluminum base is probably more rigid than some of the
> plastic models available.
>
> Joe Ramirez[/color]

Thanks for the reply, Joe. I was not sure if the highback would
collapse enough for safe transport on a plane, so you have answered my
question!

I don't mind the aluminum base, as my K2 is same construction...but
the plasmas do have a rubber padding that has *some* damping effects
on vibrations/chatter.

I will look into the Spi line.

Anyone heard from lonerider/Arvin? Used to see his opinions here
quite often, along with Neil. This group seems to have become quiet
with the exception of the MI5 nonsense.

Thanks again,

Sean
Reply
#4
On Jan 4, 12:04 am, Sean <[email protected]> wrote:[color=blue]
> On Jan 3, 11:09 pm, [email protected] wrote:
>
>
>
>
>[color=green]
> > On Jan 3, 9:34 pm, Sean <[email protected]> wrote:[/color]
>[color=green][color=darkred]
> > > Hi All,[/color][/color]
>[color=green][color=darkred]
> > > I have a Salomon Link with some older K2 Plasma 10 bindings that need
> > > to be replaced.  Do any of you have any suggestions for a
> > > replacement?  I freeride only and am looking for something that is a
> > > little forgiving and not too rigid.  I have looked at the Flow setup
> > > and like the in/out design but I have heard that they do not collapse
> > > making travel a bit tough.[/color][/color]
>[color=green]
> > By "travel," do you mean in a car, or on a plane? If you detach the
> > strap -- something you wouldn't do in day-to-day use, but is OK for
> > traveling -- you can push the Flow highback down farther, making it
> > easier to pack and ship your board. If you don't do that, you are
> > correct that the Flows create larger "humps" on the board than strap
> > bindings. Still, I've found that they will fit through the typical
> > automobile trunk-rear seat pass-through.[/color]
>[color=green][color=darkred]
> > > Does anyone have any insight on who is putting out the best product?[/color][/color]
>[color=green]
> > I have the Ride SPi's, which I like a lot. Good for freeriding,
> > although the aluminum base is probably more rigid than some of the
> > plastic models available.[/color]
>[color=green]
> > Joe Ramirez[/color]
>
> Thanks for the reply, Joe.  I was not sure if the highback would
> collapse enough for safe transport on a plane, so you have answered my
> question![/color]

A couple of years ago, we flew to Calgary and I put two complete sets
of gear, mine and my son's, into one snowboard bag. We both had Flow
bindings at the time, so I took both sets completely off the boards
and labeled every single part so I could reassemble everything
properly at the hotel. Smile Very annoying on the whole. With just one
board in a bag, you wouldn't need to do all that.
[color=blue]
> I don't mind the aluminum base, as my K2 is same construction...but
> the plasmas do have a rubber padding that has *some* damping effects
> on vibrations/chatter.
>
> I will look into the Spi line.[/color]

The SPi's have nice rubber pads over the alum. base. I think most Ride
bindings have these; not sure if they all do.

Joe Ramirez
Reply
#5
[color=blue]
> A couple of years ago, we flew to Calgary and I put two complete sets
> of gear, mine and my son's, into  one snowboard bag. We both had Flow
> bindings at the time, so I took both sets completely off the boards
> and labeled every single part so I could reassemble everything
> properly at the hotel. Smile  Very annoying on the whole. With just one
> board in a bag, you wouldn't need to do all that.
>[color=green]
> > I don't mind the aluminum base, as my K2 is same construction...but
> > the plasmas do have a rubber padding that has *some* damping effects
> > on vibrations/chatter.[/color]
>[color=green]
> > I will look into the Spi line.[/color]
>
> The SPi's have nice rubber pads over the alum. base. I think most Ride
> bindings have these; not sure if they all do.
>
> Joe Ramirez- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -[/color]

Heh....luckily my wife is a skiier, so we each have our own gear bag.

Thanks again for the reply. If anyone else has any opinions to share,
please post!

Sean
Reply
#6
Hi Sean,

I demo'ed a pair of Salomon Relay Pro's this year. They feel different
enough that I would recommend you demo'ing them as well.
Very flexible from the front to the back of the board. (Skateboard'ish)
Extremely easy to go heal side. Going toe side is more of a challenge
for reasons I cannot grasp yet.

As for Arvin, have not heard from him on the group this year. It's
almost like it is not winter yet.

Chris
Reply
#7
Thanks for the reply Chris. I poked around the intertubes and found a ton
of reviews for the Relay Pro's that were positive. I wish I lived near a
mountain so I could demo a pair...being in the southeast makes that kind of
difficult Smile.

I liked my K2's heelside move, but I'm much stronger going heel side than
toe side. It's kind of a strange feeling - while heel side, I have no
problem getting the edge to work for me putting down a nice, narrow line in
the snow. Toe side, on the other hand, I feel like I am about to launch off
the mountain with much less control. Something to work on this year. Do you
think the Relay Pro's have some flex in them going toe side transition? I
spent my youth on skateboards (mainly pipes) so the flexibility sounds very
appealing.

Arvin pointed me to a couple of choices for a new board two years ago...I
ended up with my Salomon Link and I really enjoy it. I only get about 10
days a year on the snow, so there isn't much opportunity to try before buy.
Anyhoo, I always enjoyed reading his technical posts.

Sean



"Christopher Cox" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected][color=blue]
> Hi Sean,
>
> I demo'ed a pair of Salomon Relay Pro's this year. They feel different
> enough that I would recommend you demo'ing them as well.
> Very flexible from the front to the back of the board. (Skateboard'ish)
> Extremely easy to go heal side. Going toe side is more of a challenge for
> reasons I cannot grasp yet.
>
> As for Arvin, have not heard from him on the group this year. It's almost
> like it is not winter yet.
>
> Chris[/color]


Reply
#8

"Sean" <UU8***@****.com> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
[color=blue]
> I liked my K2's heelside move, but I'm much stronger going heel side than toe
> side. It's kind of a strange feeling - while heel side, I have no problem
> getting the edge to work for me putting down a nice, narrow line in the snow.
> Toe side, on the other hand, I feel like I am about to launch off the mountain
> with much less control.[/color]

One thing I've found is that my bindings by themself do not allow enough forward
lean. This limits how much I can bend my knees on toeside to absorb bumps.
Therefore the bumps tend to throw me around a lot. On my old board, I made a
pair of wedge shaped risers to give me a couple degrees more of forward lean,
which pretty much solved the problem. I just got a new board which doesn't yet
have the risers installed, and have found I have much more of a problem turning
toeside again. I am just finishing a new riser set for that board.

The riser is just a piece of 3/4" plywood cut carefully with a handsaw into a
wedge of about 1/4" at the front and 1/2" at the back. I then cut the pieces to
match the bottom of the binding, and cut a hole for the binding plate. Next, I
primed the wood, and then coated the whole thing with polyurethane caulk using
an old credit card to give it a rubbery grip surface, and bought longer screws
for mounting the bindings through it.

Bob


Reply
#9
> One thing I've found is that my bindings by themself do not allow enough[color=blue]
> forward lean. This limits how much I can bend my knees on toeside to
> absorb bumps. Therefore the bumps tend to throw me around a lot. On my old
> board, I made a pair of wedge shaped risers to give me a couple degrees
> more of forward lean, which pretty much solved the problem. I just got a
> new board which doesn't yet have the risers installed, and have found I
> have much more of a problem turning toeside again. I am just finishing a
> new riser set for that board.
>
> The riser is just a piece of 3/4" plywood cut carefully with a handsaw
> into a wedge of about 1/4" at the front and 1/2" at the back. I then cut
> the pieces to match the bottom of the binding, and cut a hole for the
> binding plate. Next, I primed the wood, and then coated the whole thing
> with polyurethane caulk using an old credit card to give it a rubbery grip
> surface, and bought longer screws for mounting the bindings through it.
>
> Bob
>
>[/color]

Innovative work, Bob. Norm Abrams would be proud! That sounds like a great
idea. I may have to run a piece through the bandsaw and see how it feels.

What type of bindings do you currently use?

Does anyone have any experience with the K2 of Flow models with the
highbacks that 'flip' down? Or should I stick with conventional?

Thanks for the reply,

Sean


Reply
#10

"Sean" <UU8***@****.com> wrote in message
news:[email protected][color=blue][color=green]
>> One thing I've found is that my bindings by themself do not allow enough
>> forward lean. This limits how much I can bend my knees on toeside to absorb
>> bumps. Therefore the bumps tend to throw me around a lot. On my old board, I
>> made a pair of wedge shaped risers to give me a couple degrees more of
>> forward lean, which pretty much solved the problem. I just got a new board
>> which doesn't yet have the risers installed, and have found I have much more
>> of a problem turning toeside again. I am just finishing a new riser set for
>> that board.
>>
>> The riser is just a piece of 3/4" plywood cut carefully with a handsaw into a
>> wedge of about 1/4" at the front and 1/2" at the back. I then cut the pieces
>> to match the bottom of the binding, and cut a hole for the binding plate.
>> Next, I primed the wood, and then coated the whole thing with polyurethane
>> caulk using an old credit card to give it a rubbery grip surface, and bought
>> longer screws for mounting the bindings through it.
>>
>> Bob
>>
>>[/color]
>
> Innovative work, Bob. Norm Abrams would be proud! That sounds like a great
> idea. I may have to run a piece through the bandsaw and see how it feels.
>
> What type of bindings do you currently use?[/color]

The ones on the newer board are Ride SPi's.
[color=blue]
>
> Does anyone have any experience with the K2 of Flow models with the highbacks
> that 'flip' down? Or should I stick with conventional?[/color]

I can't help here.

Bob


Reply
#11
On Jan 4, 6:52 pm, "Sean" <UU8***@****.com> wrote:
[color=blue]
> Does anyone have any experience with the K2 of Flow models with the
> highbacks that 'flip' down? Or should I stick with conventional?[/color]

I'm a rear entry convert ;-)

I've had K2 Cinch for the last two years and for about
three years before that Flow FL11s. My experience with
Flows is therefore about 5 years out of date. I don't
think I'll go back to normal straps though, for comfort
and convenience.

The main advantage of both variations is the speed of
strapping in when you get off the lift. There may be
problems strapping in in deep powder, but that's not
something I often have the pleasure in coping with.
Also there are less problems with frozen ratchets.
They'er both a bit heavier than regular bindings
though.

Additionally, I find that Flows are much more
comfortable than strap bindings due to the better
distribution of pressure. For this reason I'd choose
Flows over the Cinches.

The Cinches do seem to grip your foot better due to
the way they clamp down, but they have a lot of
moving parts (more to go wrong?) and they are not
as stiff. Also because they have regular straps,
they can cause foot pain/cramps like regular
bindings, but on the other hand, it's easy to
ratchet them down an extra click before you hoon
down something stupid, which is always nice.

Like everything, it's best to try before you buy,
though if you rent Flows you'll probably end up
testing the cheapest ones.

Cheers.
Iain.
Reply
#12
On Fri, 04 Jan 2008 10:08:52 -0500, Sean wrote:
[color=blue]
> I liked my K2's heelside move, but I'm much stronger going heel side
> than toe side. It's kind of a strange feeling - while heel side, I have
> no problem getting the edge to work for me putting down a nice, narrow
> line in the snow. Toe side, on the other hand, I feel like I am about
> to launch off the mountain with much less control. Something to work on
> this year.[/color]

That's quite unusual. Everybody I heared about it, has more problems with
heel side pressure than toe side.

Maybe you can have someone take a short film of you when carving. I think
that someone knowledgeable about boarding will immediately see the problem.

--
Bas.
Reply
#13
On Thu, 03 Jan 2008 18:34:20 -0800, Sean wrote:
[color=blue]
> I have a Salomon Link with some older K2 Plasma 10 bindings that need to
> be replaced. Do any of you have any suggestions for a replacement? I
> freeride only and am looking for something that is a little forgiving
> and not too rigid.[/color]

You could consider Wed'ze FR6 binding. Cheap but good. They also have a
FR9, but that one is designed for their FR9 board, which is very stiff.
[color=blue]
> I have looked at the Flow setup and like the in/out
> design but I have heard that they do not collapse making travel a bit
> tough.[/color]

For quick in/out bindings, I would recommend looking at the ones from K2.
Still the straps instead of the cap for more feel but with the easy in/out.

--
Bas.
Reply
#14
On Jan 5, 1:31 pm, Bas Mevissen <[email protected]>
wrote:[color=blue]
> On Thu, 03 Jan 2008 18:34:20 -0800, Sean wrote:[color=green]
> > I have a Salomon Link with some older K2 Plasma 10 bindings that need to
> > be replaced.  Do any of you have any suggestions for a replacement?  I
> > freeride only and am looking for something that is a little forgiving
> > and not too rigid.  [/color]
>
> You could consider Wed'ze FR6 binding. Cheap but good. They also have a
> FR9, but that one is designed for their FR9 board, which is very stiff.
>[color=green]
> > I have looked at the Flow setup and like the in/out
> > design but I have heard that they do not collapse making travel a bit
> > tough.[/color]
>
> For quick in/out bindings, I would recommend looking at the ones from K2.
> Still the straps instead of the cap for more feel but with the easy in/out..
>
> --
> Bas.[/color]

Thanks for the replies everyone. I took my boots to our local shop
hoping to kick the tires a bit on some of the various bindings that
have been discussed here. The shop actually took the effort to attach
a couple of them to boards for me and see how they felt with my
boots. I tried the Ride Spi's and Flow NXT....both felt great and fit
my Buton's well so I went ahead and took the plunge with the Flows.
The construction felt solid and there were not as many moving parts as
the Cinch. The cable/release system on the Flow highback seemed well
engineered - didn't look to be much opportunity for sheath chafing on
the cable. There is a bit of redundancy built in at the cable attach
points; if the inner screw backs out over the course of riding, there
is a secondary screw that will maintain the cable integrity. The
'powerstrap' felt nice on my feet; no pinching or awkward pressure
points that I sometimes felt with my conventional bindings at the
ratchets. I was also pleasantly suprised at the low amount of give at
the strap while moving back and forth. The single strap setup felt
sturdy and there was not any noticeable give when leaning toe or
heelside.

I know that performance is an unknown until I get some time on the
slopes, but I felt comfortable with the decision and look forward to
the new setup. I'll really know the performance after my first yard
sale Smile.

Thanks again for everyone's input and experience. I'm heading west in
mid February and I'll post my thoughts on performance then.

Hope Ullr keeps up the December dump into 2008 for the midwest...

Sean
Reply
#15
On Jan 6, 7:19 am, Sean <[email protected]> wrote:[color=blue]
> boots. I tried the Ride Spi's and Flow NXT....both felt great and fit
> my Buton's well so I went ahead and took the plunge with the Flows.[/color]

Hi Sean,

So which NXTs did you go for, the FX, FS or AT?

I hope they work out for you!

Cheers.
Iain.
Reply


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