Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Boots for flat feet, low instep
#1
Perhaps you can help ....

I evidently have a very low instep, flat and narrow feet. I'm looking
for a not-quite racing boot - I'm a former high school and college
racer and have been skiing my whole life - I consider myself an expert
skier, but I'm getting older and want a little more comfort that I have
in my Tecnica TNS boots that I've had for about 15-20 years or so.

I've been to a couple of boot fitters (MasterFit U folks and others)
and tried on a number of stock models to get started with
modifications. The boot that was the most comfortable was the Salomon
Falcon 10 - well regarded by the magazines, and I skied the old Salomon
rear entry boots before my Tecnica's. The best thing about the old
Salomons was the cable system that could lock your heel in. They were
really uncomfortable, but nothing fit me better at the time.

At this point, I've been professionally fit (in a 27.5), and skied
about 5 days in the new boots. Seems like they are too large already -
my ski tips can shake several inches without any pressure applied to
the boot unless I crank them down and cut off my circulation. Then I
have the control I want, but I'm pretty uncomfortable. Back to square
one ...

Questions:
1. Should I get the same boot, smaller size? I tried on a 26.5 in the
past and my toes were initially crunched at the end. That said, in the
27.5, my toes barely touch the ends when standing, and come away with
plenty of room when in a turn.

2. Should I get a wider boot and crank them down more? I've noticed
that cranking down the Falcon make the boot narrower, as well as
decreasing some of the room over the instep. That can hurt. Should I go
wider (100mm last instead of 98mm) and be a little more comfortable
when tightening?

3. Should I just add padding? Tongue pads, insoles under the custom
inner sole can take up some room.

Any help/advice appreciated!

Buckaroo

Reply
#2

"Buckaroo" <No Address> wrote in message
news:[email protected][color=blue]
> Perhaps you can help ....
>
> I evidently have a very low instep, flat and narrow feet. I'm looking for
> a not-quite racing boot - I'm a former high school and college racer and
> have been skiing my whole life - I consider myself an expert skier, but
> I'm getting older and want a little more comfort that I have in my Tecnica
> TNS boots that I've had for about 15-20 years or so.
>
> I've been to a couple of boot fitters (MasterFit U folks and others) and
> tried on a number of stock models to get started with modifications. The
> boot that was the most comfortable was the Salomon Falcon 10 - well
> regarded by the magazines, and I skied the old Salomon rear entry boots
> before my Tecnica's. The best thing about the old Salomons was the cable
> system that could lock your heel in. They were really uncomfortable, but
> nothing fit me better at the time.
>
> At this point, I've been professionally fit (in a 27.5), and skied about 5
> days in the new boots. Seems like they are too large already - my ski tips
> can shake several inches without any pressure applied to the boot unless I
> crank them down and cut off my circulation. Then I have the control I
> want, but I'm pretty uncomfortable. Back to square one ...
>
> Questions:
> 1. Should I get the same boot, smaller size? I tried on a 26.5 in the past
> and my toes were initially crunched at the end. That said, in the 27.5, my
> toes barely touch the ends when standing, and come away with plenty of
> room when in a turn.
>
> 2. Should I get a wider boot and crank them down more? I've noticed that
> cranking down the Falcon make the boot narrower, as well as decreasing
> some of the room over the instep. That can hurt. Should I go wider (100mm
> last instead of 98mm) and be a little more comfortable when tightening?
>
> 3. Should I just add padding? Tongue pads, insoles under the custom inner
> sole can take up some room.
>
> Any help/advice appreciated!
>
> Buckaroo
>[/color]
I also have narrow and almost flat feet. I bought a Lange Comp 100 and they
fit me well. I didn't need any boot work like I did on my last boot
SanMarco's. I like the Lange they are very comfortable, well padded and
warm. I was looking for the Lange Freestyle 100 but couldn't find them.
Lange is made for a narrower foot so you might be pleased with them. I
would also recommend getting orthotics or a good foot bed. I have been
using Phase 4 orthotics and at $25 per pair you can't go wrong, they are
just lie the ones that cost over $300 from a foot doctor or any place that
requires you to go in and get your foot measured. I went that way several
years ago and found that these were identical to the $300 orthotics.

Well good luck in your boot search and happy skiing...

JQ
Dancing on the edge


Reply
#3
I tried on 2 Langes, 3 Nordicas, 2 Tecnicas, 4 Salomons, and a Head. I
really have a 10.5 C foot, and had a custom orthotic made after plenty
of measuring ....

Buckaroo


On 2008-01-12 23:47:48 -0500, Dan <[email protected]> said:
[color=blue]
> On 1/11/08 9:10 PM, Buckaroo wrote:[color=green]
>> Perhaps you can help ....
>>
>> I evidently have a very low instep, flat and narrow feet. I'm looking
>> for a not-quite racing boot - I'm a former high school and college
>> racer and have been skiing my whole life - I consider myself an expert
>> skier, but I'm getting older and want a little more comfort that I have
>> in my Tecnica TNS boots that I've had for about 15-20 years or so.
>>
>> I've been to a couple of boot fitters (MasterFit U folks and others)
>> and tried on a number of stock models to get started with
>> modifications. The boot that was the most comfortable was the Salomon
>> Falcon 10 - well regarded by the magazines, and I skied the old Salomon
>> rear entry boots before my Tecnica's. The best thing about the old
>> Salomons was the cable system that could lock your heel in. They were
>> really uncomfortable, but nothing fit me better at the time.
>>
>> At this point, I've been professionally fit (in a 27.5), and skied
>> about 5 days in the new boots. Seems like they are too large already -
>> my ski tips can shake several inches without any pressure applied to
>> the boot unless I crank them down and cut off my circulation. Then I
>> have the control I want, but I'm pretty uncomfortable. Back to square
>> one ...
>>
>> Questions:
>> 1. Should I get the same boot, smaller size? I tried on a 26.5 in the
>> past and my toes were initially crunched at the end. That said, in the
>> 27.5, my toes barely touch the ends when standing, and come away with
>> plenty of room when in a turn.
>>
>> 2. Should I get a wider boot and crank them down more? I've noticed
>> that cranking down the Falcon make the boot narrower, as well as
>> decreasing some of the room over the instep. That can hurt. Should I go
>> wider (100mm last instead of 98mm) and be a little more comfortable
>> when tightening?
>>
>> 3. Should I just add padding? Tongue pads, insoles under the custom
>> inner sole can take up some room.
>>
>> Any help/advice appreciated!
>>
>> Buckaroo
>>[/color]
>
> How many boots did you try on? When I bought my last pair I tried 15
> models to find the best fit. Thankfully my foot is not problematic
> that much besides a high arch. Just like shoes if the the boot is
> uncomfortable right away move on. Adding padding is not going to help
> for major needs as the foot needs to be guaranteed stable. Also, now
> that you're older, your feet might complain more so if you can consult
> with a podiatrist who is a skier then go that way to get a custom liner.
>
> For DYI: see [url]http://www.skinetsports.com/html/askclaudeMain.html#bootNarrow[/url]
>
> "Have a really narrow foot?
> Not all, but most boot manufacturers consider the average American
> woman’s foot to be a "B" width and man’s a "D" width. One of the most
> difficult issues to address is the foot with a low instep and arch
> coupled with a narrow foot. Women "A" and Men "B" or less. The best
> solution is to find the closest fitting shell possible, replace the
> stock liner with a foam or silicone liner and an aggressive footbed or
> orthotic."
>
> Good luck!
> Dan[/color]


Reply
#4

"Buckaroo" <No Address> wrote in message
news:[email protected][color=blue]
>I tried on 2 Langes, 3 Nordicas, 2 Tecnicas, 4 Salomons, and a Head. I
>really have a 10.5 C foot, and had a custom orthotic made after plenty of
>measuring ....
>
> Buckaroo[/color]

Your foot seems very much like mine. Try the Lange Freestyle or Comp series
size 28.5 or 29, they fitted much better than the other Lange's that I
tried. Make sure you put the orthotics in and wear ski socks when you try
on the boots. All the Salomons that I tried were a little too wide, I
liked the padding in their boots though, the others were way too wide.

JQ
Dancing on the edge
[color=blue]
>
>
> On 2008-01-12 23:47:48 -0500, Dan <[email protected]> said:
>[color=green]
>> On 1/11/08 9:10 PM, Buckaroo wrote:[color=darkred]
>>> Perhaps you can help ....
>>>
>>> I evidently have a very low instep, flat and narrow feet. I'm looking
>>> for a not-quite racing boot - I'm a former high school and college racer
>>> and have been skiing my whole life - I consider myself an expert skier,
>>> but I'm getting older and want a little more comfort that I have in my
>>> Tecnica TNS boots that I've had for about 15-20 years or so.
>>>
>>> I've been to a couple of boot fitters (MasterFit U folks and others) and
>>> tried on a number of stock models to get started with modifications. The
>>> boot that was the most comfortable was the Salomon Falcon 10 - well
>>> regarded by the magazines, and I skied the old Salomon rear entry boots
>>> before my Tecnica's. The best thing about the old Salomons was the cable
>>> system that could lock your heel in. They were really uncomfortable, but
>>> nothing fit me better at the time.
>>>
>>> At this point, I've been professionally fit (in a 27.5), and skied about
>>> 5 days in the new boots. Seems like they are too large already - my ski
>>> tips can shake several inches without any pressure applied to the boot
>>> unless I crank them down and cut off my circulation. Then I have the
>>> control I want, but I'm pretty uncomfortable. Back to square one ...
>>>
>>> Questions:
>>> 1. Should I get the same boot, smaller size? I tried on a 26.5 in the
>>> past and my toes were initially crunched at the end. That said, in the
>>> 27.5, my toes barely touch the ends when standing, and come away with
>>> plenty of room when in a turn.
>>>
>>> 2. Should I get a wider boot and crank them down more? I've noticed that
>>> cranking down the Falcon make the boot narrower, as well as decreasing
>>> some of the room over the instep. That can hurt. Should I go wider
>>> (100mm last instead of 98mm) and be a little more comfortable when
>>> tightening?
>>>
>>> 3. Should I just add padding? Tongue pads, insoles under the custom
>>> inner sole can take up some room.
>>>
>>> Any help/advice appreciated!
>>>
>>> Buckaroo
>>>[/color]
>>
>> How many boots did you try on? When I bought my last pair I tried 15
>> models to find the best fit. Thankfully my foot is not problematic that
>> much besides a high arch. Just like shoes if the the boot is
>> uncomfortable right away move on. Adding padding is not going to help
>> for major needs as the foot needs to be guaranteed stable. Also, now
>> that you're older, your feet might complain more so if you can consult
>> with a podiatrist who is a skier then go that way to get a custom liner.
>>
>> For DYI: see
>> [url]http://www.skinetsports.com/html/askclaudeMain.html#bootNarrow[/url]
>>
>> "Have a really narrow foot?
>> Not all, but most boot manufacturers consider the average American woman's
>> foot to be a "B" width and man's a "D" width. One of the most difficult
>> issues to address is the foot with a low instep and arch coupled with a
>> narrow foot. Women "A" and Men "B" or less. The best solution is to find
>> the closest fitting shell possible, replace the stock liner with a foam
>> or silicone liner and an aggressive footbed or orthotic."
>>
>> Good luck!
>> Dan[/color]
>
>[/color]


Reply
#5
Actually, I'm a men's size 10.5 (US).

I'm going to try a 27.0 this weekend - same shell, thicker liner, and
see what happens.

If you know of a lower volume boot (Skiing magazine had a run down
earlier this year), that's one off from a racing boot, let me know. For
me, the problem is that a plug boot might fit me well, but they are
stiffer than I need at this point, and not at all comfortable.



On 2008-01-15 05:07:51 -0500, "ant" <[email protected]> said:
[color=blue]
> Buckaroo wrote:
>[color=green]
>> I've been to a couple of boot fitters (MasterFit U folks and others)[/color]
>
> Don't get dazzled by the MasterFit thing. Some are good, some are salesmen.
>[color=green]
>> and tried on a number of stock models to get started with
>> modifications. The boot that was the most comfortable was the Salomon
>> Falcon 10 - well regarded by the magazines, and I skied the old
>> Salomon rear entry boots before my Tecnica's. The best thing about
>> the old Salomons was the cable system that could lock your heel in.
>> They were really uncomfortable, but nothing fit me better at the time.[/color]
>
> The cable didn't really "lock" your heel in. It just pressed down from
> above. A better way is to get a boot with a shell that approximates the
> shape (and size) of your heel.
>
> You really want to find a boot with a shell that fits you as well as
> possible. Mods like foamed liners etc are just gimicks to get a boot that
> doesn't fit, to fit. It'll only fit for a while and then all the problems
> will come back. I found my boots by happening on a US ski magazine boot
> "test" that outlined the foot shape each boot was made for. worked a treat,
> I found the boots I was after on display, put them on, and they fit, right
> off the shelf.
>
> I had them widened because when teaching, you tended to stand about more and
> I needed them a smidge wider. That was it. For normal skiing, they'd have
> not needed mods.
>[color=green]
>> At this point, I've been professionally fit (in a 27.5),[/color]
>
> So you're a men's US shoe size 9?
>
> and skied[color=green]
>> about 5 days in the new boots. Seems like they are too large already -
>> my ski tips can shake several inches without any pressure applied to
>> the boot unless I crank them down and cut off my circulation. Then I
>> have the control I want, but I'm pretty uncomfortable. Back to square
>> one ...[/color]
>
> I hate to tell you this, but you should be able to ski without mishap
> (albeit on groomers) with your boots completely undone. This ensures you are
> skiing by being right on top of your feet, rather than hanging off your
> boots. Skiing through the soles of your feet, not through the cuffs.
>
> If your feet are sliding around in the boots, you'll be more likely to seek
> strength by leaning back, and that'll have the ski tips wobbling about.
>
> (tale of pain snipped)
>
> Feet, and boots, come in all sizes *and shapes*. If the boot is the wrong
> shape for your foot, the size changes won't really help much. That said,
> skiing in a too-big boot is very common with skiiers and causes all kinds of
> problems. You need to go on the hunt for a shell that is made for your shape
> foot/ankle/leg. If you're stuck with the boots you got, you can fix it in
> the short term with foamed inners. Pricey, but it's a good fix for a bad
> boot. If you need to get foams done with a boot you're buying in a shop,
> leave and find another shop! The boot doesn't fit.
>
> The liners (stock standard ones) in my boots are falling apart, but I just
> couldn't see a reason to change them, so didn't. Might one day, maybe. The
> hard shells fit, and the liners are just there for comfort and to help with
> the moving bits.[/color]


Reply
#6
Buckaroo wrote:[color=blue]
> Actually, I'm a men's size 10.5 (US).
>
> I'm going to try a 27.0 this weekend - same shell, thicker liner, and
> see what happens.[/color]

Bad idea to pad out boots - shell should fit the foot with minimal inner
boot thickness. Thick liners invariably crush out for sloppy fit after
just weeks. FWIW almost all ski boot companies try to get two sizes out
of each mold, stuffing padding in for the smaller size - what a skier
wants is to be the larger size in any given shell resulting in minimum
padding.

I cringe at your original statement: "The boot that was the most
comfortable..." You don't by ski boots by comfort in the store; you buy
boots by functional fit to your foot type and your skier type, and that
results in comfort when the boots are properly adjusted.

Anyway, if you used a good bootfitter the fit should be guaranteed -
just keep going in to have adjustments made until you're satisfied, or
even demand to start over in a different boot, or get your money back
and go to a real professional bootfitter. BTW, a real bootfitter would
be willing to tell a customer that none of the boots he carries will
foot your foot size; a really good bootfitter will carry boot lines that
fit the range of human feet, meaning you'll see some oddball boot lines
that fill in some size gaps and not just the usual suspects.
[color=blue]
> If you know of a lower volume boot[/color]

<http://www.fulltiltskiboots.com/>

Narrow close fitting boot. Cloned from the original Flexon molds...
(Secretly owned by K2 IIRC.)
Reply
#7
On Tue, 15 Jan 2008 21:07:51 +1100, "ant" <[email protected]>
wrote:
[color=blue]
>I hate to tell you this, but you should be able to ski without mishap
>(albeit on groomers) with your boots completely undone.[/color]

This is true. I ski with 2 of the 4 buckles undone completely (those
across the foot) all the time with no worries whatsoever.

Suzie
--
Suzieflame

Adieu alt.horror
Reply


Possibly Related Threads…
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Re: Boots Stuart Chan 1 7,145 05-28-2009, 07:29 AM
Last Post: MagicOPromotion
  Re: Custom boots - Any shops in the Bay Area? lal_truckee 1 1,064 01-24-2008, 01:22 PM
Last Post: Serena

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)